• Information

    Senile Warts

These lesions are common benign lesions that are occasionally mistakenly interpreted as ‘moles’. They are harmless lesions but can be a cosmetic nuisance. They can appear anywhere on the body and as a result many sufferers become concerned with the unsightly appearance and would like to have them removed.

Dr Hussein’s laser techniques

The good news is that senile warts are fairly easy to remove. This is because the lesions grow from the outer layer of the skin. As a result, removal is almost always scar free if performed carefully by an expert with the right equipment.

Dr Hussein performs quick, efficient and painless removal of these lesions with Erbium YAG or CO2 laser. The advantage of laser removal is that lesion removal can be precisely controlled. The lesion can be removed and wiped away leaving minimal trauma to the underlying normal skin. Healing is therefore rapid and any risk of discolouration of scarring of the skin is kept to a minimum. Ensuring the best possible cosmetic outcome is one of Dr Hussein’s primary objectives. This is why he uses state-of-the-art laser to perform removal of these simple lesions.

Dr Hussein has included two videos of laser removal techniques in this section, so you can inform yourself adequately before booking for this treatment.

Other Techniques

Cryotherapy with liquid nitrogen (freezing). can be used. Cryotherapy is not as easy to control as laser removal. It carries a higher risk of lightening the skin due to damage to the melanin producing cells deeper within skin. Whereas this may not be so worrying on lighter skins, it can be a problem on darker skin types. Potentially more of a problem than the original lesion itself. Risk of this complication is greatly reduced through use of laser. Cryotherapy also often results in incomplete removal. This is because whilst freezing the tissue the doctor is unable to accurately judge when the lesion has been adequately frozen. As a result, the doctor will often err on the side of caution as to over freeze risks creating white marks or scarring on the patient’s skin. The consequence of this is partial removal of the lesion.

Cautery and curettage (burning and scraping) is also a valid technique for removal of these lesions. It is not as easy to control the depth of damage when performing this technique and as a result there is an increased chance of damage to the underlying skin. It is also not an easy technique to apply to larger lesions.